Dylan On The Island Of Sodor

I had the idea to take Dylan to the Isle of Man after reading that it was the basis for the Thomas the Tank Engine stories. The Isle of Man forms the Diocese of ‘Sodor and Man’ and the island’s Bishop is known as ‘Bishop of Sodor and Man’. There is, however, no island of Sodor;  the name is Old Norse and refers to the Scottish Hebrides which were once part of ‘The Kingdom of Mann and the Isles’ but over which the Bishop no longer has authority. The Reverend W Awdry modelled his fictional Island of Sodor on the Isle of Man, inspired by holidays he spent there as a child.

My research suggested the Isle of Man could be an ideal holiday destination for Dylan as well:  far enough to require an overnight stay in a hotel (which he loves), a ferry trip (which he adores) and (once on the island) trams and trains galore.  I am happy to report that the island didn’t disappoint…

Day One

I have kept my resolve of ‘no more Premier Inns‘  and Dylan, it turns out, is perfectly happy to stay in any chain of hotel.  What this has taught me is that Dylan uses language creatively:  when he said ‘moon’  (based on the Premier Inn logo) he meant hotel. Without the word ‘hotel’, Dylan found a word to describe the thing he wanted to talk about.  Now that we are not staying in Premier Inns, he uses the word ‘bed’ instead of ‘moon’.

Our en route overnight stays in Liverpool also reminded me how keen Dylan’s memory is. We had visited Liverpool once before and Dylan had enjoyed riding a carousel at the Albert Docks.  I had forgotten this but Dylan hadn’t; he said ‘horse’ repeatedly over dinner that evening and afterwards set up such a pace along the quayside I fell over trying to catch up. He was heading for the carousel I realised later (unfortunately, not working).

The fall was a shock: I sprawled flat out on the cobbles. Of course, people rushed to help me and I brushed them off – but afterwards I realised I was sore and bruised. It was a good reminder about supporting Dylan; after that, I made sure I kept him within reach, at the end of my voice. ‘You have to wait for your mum. Dylan’, I said. ‘I’m not as quick as you are’. For the first time, I had a sense of what it feels like to be an ageing parent.

Day Two

We left England in a heat wave and sailed to the Island of Sodor on a perfectly still sea. The next day, however, we woke to soaking rain. ‘Henry, Henry’, Dylan kept telling me. It took me a while to realise he wanted me to talk about the story where Henry stays in a tunnel because he doesn’t want to get his paint wet. It turned out that we would talk about Henry a lot during the week 😦

After a drenching on the coast path above Peel on our first day on the island, we headed back to our cottage in St John’s, the centre of the Isle of Man and the site of a Viking Parliament (or ‘Thing’). I was interested in the history and politics of Tynwad Hill but Dylan was more interested in the Tynwald Inn. He really enjoys spending time in pubs;  a packet of crisps and a couple of pints of blackcurrant cordial make Dylan very happy indeed.

We had daily ‘programme strips’ and an assortment of symbols with us and each evening Dylan and I would negotiate activities for the following day.  Later in the week Dylan picked out a ‘pub’ symbol and, looking to see if I agreed, added it on our programme for the following evening. I love it when Dylan’s symbols become genuine two-way communication like this.

 

Day Three

More rain so we drove to Port Erin where we took a steam train to Douglas. Dylan’s delight in the crashing waves in the bay reminded me not to assume that bad weather is a bad thing.

Day Four

As well as steam trains the island has an electric train line. Today we took it from Douglas as far as Laxey where we visited a water wheel – another of Dylan’s special interests. Then, it was up Snaefell, the highest mountain on the island, by electric rail. We couldn’t see much but sometimes it’s the journey not the destination that matters.  Dylan seemed to like riding the electric trains even more than the steam trains.

Day Five

today we woke to a strange silence on Sodor:  it had stopped raining.  We chanced the coastal path, tracking the southern peninsula between Port Erin and Port St Mary. We didn’t see any porpoises in The Sound but it was a fabulous day. The only tricky moment was when the steam train back to Port Erin which I had promised we would take (and clock-watched all day, so as to be in time for) didn’t turn up 😦  Dylan was rattled but he accepted the ordinary alternative (under any other circumstances his heart’s delight) of a country bus…

Day Six

More rain. More road diversions (something to do with Quad bikes and the TT). Undeterred we found a way to Ramsey where we took the electric train south to Laxey, the point at which we had left the line earlier in the week. This was not my best idea; having been to Laxey before, Dylan wanted to re-visit the wheel and take the mountain train again. And the train timetable wasn’t set up to accommodate my itinerary; we had a long wait on the platform for a northbound train. Back in Ramsey, it was still raining…

Day Seven

On our last day we woke to sun 🙂 I had been told to make sure I visited one of the island’s many glens so today we followed a Greenway before plunging into Glen Maye. Here was justification for rain: green, lush, strangely tropical.  Oh it was glorious! The attraction, for Dylan, was a waterfall; he watched the water, transfixed. The glen winds down to a small cove where Dylan threw stones. Then it was a scramble up to the coast path and on to Peel where we visited the castle and (at last) paddled in the sea.

Day Eight

Douglas is famed for its horse trams but we hadn’t seen them all week due to the rain. Dylan had seemed curious about the ‘horse and carriage’ symbol we had with us so I was pleased to see them in Douglas on the day we were leaving. They operate to a strict timetable, however, and there wasn’t time for us to ride around the bay before check-in for our ferry.

Explaining this to Dylan was difficult. He was insistent, pulling me towards the horse and trying to climb into the carriage. A quick-thinking passenger  suggested we ride as far as the Villa Marina and walk back in time for our ferry. I was a little nervous about whether Dylan would get off when the time came but I decided to chance it.  I am glad that I did as it turned out that Dylan had a particular reason for wanting to ride in a horse tram. As we set off he turned to me and said ‘Pinocchio’, with an air of satisfaction. Pinocchio? I replied, puzzled. Then I remembered that, at some point in the story, Pinocchio rides in a horse and carriage; Dylan had made a connection between his life and his books.

On the boat, Dylan loves to look out at the wake behind us.  I had pre-booked seats in one of the lounges and we were lucky that this gave access to a small deck at the back where Dylan could stand. He was there for over an hour after we left Liverpool and it was the same when we left Douglas. As we pulled away, the Isle of Man seemed tethered under cloud like myth.

Day Nine

We stayed a night in Liverpool again on our return journey (sadly, the horse carousel was still not working). Before we left next morning, we called in to see an Egon Schiele/Fancesca Woodman exhibition at the Tate. I hadn’t been to Tate Liverpool before so this was a great opportunity to visit and an excellent end to the holiday. How lucky I am that Dylan shares my love of art – his visual intelligence and sensitivity make him a most excellent person to visit with 🙂

Stopping to picnic on the way home, we needed sun hats; England was as warm as when we left. We had had such a good time on the Island of Sodor, though, the rain didn’t matter. ‘We weren’t like Henry’ I said to Dylan. ‘We didn’t mind getting wet’.

 

 

About Time

Dylan in Durham earlier this month…

The trip to Durham might have been successful in all sorts of ways but it didn’t satiate Dylan’s desire for a holiday. We had only been back 24 hours when the questions about ‘cottage’, ‘ sea’ and ‘boat’ started up again.  Dylan enjoyed our city break but it wasn’t the holiday he knows, in his sinew and bone, he has not yet had this year and which he is not going to let me forget.

Are you sure we can’t make him a countdown chart to our Summer holiday? I asked the staff at his care home.  I have booked a holiday on the Isle of Man, which I have an idea might be Dylan heaven: an overnight hotel en route, a ferry boat crossing, holiday cottage, sea all around us and trains, trams and funiculars. But that isn’t until the end of July.  I don’t think we can give him a three month countdown chart, the team leader reflected.  Having a picture of the holiday such a long way off could be difficult for Dylan.

So Dylan has continued with just his weekly programme. When he’s asked ‘cottage’ or ‘sea’ or ‘boat’ we’ve said:  not this week, Dylan, or later, or sometimes (in desperation) soon Dylan. Of course, none of these are easy, or I suspect meaningful, for Dylan. Time, as I have frequently noted, is one of the most difficult concepts for Dylan to grasp.  If you add to this our inability to explain to Dylan the practicalities of work and money, and that we cannot take holidays whenever we want to, then we have a potentially frustrating situation. Dylan is communicating beautifully with us and waiting patiently for a response, but it must feel as if all he is hearing is ‘No’.

The future is a cork board

Cork board with countdown chart added

One of our routines, when I return Dylan to his residential setting after his weekend at home, is to go through his weekly programme.  Dylan’s programme is fastened to his whiteboard and we talk about everything he will do in the week, ending with my arriving to collect him the following weekend. Dylan points to the pictures and I name them, sometimes signing and sometimes pausing to see whether Dylan is able to name them himself.

When I was talking Dylan through his week a couple of weekends ago, however, his finger didn’t stop pointing when we got to my arrival the following Saturday – instead, he gestured at the cork board to the right of his whiteboard.  He walked over to it, stabbing at it with his finger and looking at me quizzically. I’m not sure what you want, Dylan. I said. The member of staff who was with us pointed out that the cork board is where Dylan pins his countdown charts when he has them. He was asking what would happen after next week.  So Dylan does have a sense of future time, albeit in a representational way:  the future is a cork board.

The shop that sells the sea

So I drove away thinking about our summer holiday and how best to support Dylan with this. I calculated that if I speeded up a bit with my marking I could take a couple of days off work later in the month.  Added  to a weekend, this would give Dylan four or five days at the coast. That would do it, surely?  So later that week I booked a few days on the Yorkshire coast; while we won’t need a boat to get there, it is by the sea and we will be staying in a cottage.

That afternoon I received Dylan’s weekly update; this is a summary of Dylan’s week with a particular focus on any ‘incidents’. The email opened : Hi Liz, He’s had a really good week this week no incidents so far he has been trying to get into travel agents while in [nearby town] but he was directed away.  Trying to get into travel agents!  How I laughed.  I have never taken Dylan into a travel agents and to my knowledge he has never been in one. And yet he had figured out  – presumably from the visual clues in the window – that this is a shop that sells the sea. How clever! Visual intelligence. Initiative. Creativity. Communication. And Dylan’s steel will and determination…

Managing time

I replied to the email to say I’d fixed something up for later this month.  The staff were also thinking of ways to respond to Dylan’s requests; his key worker had volunteered to investigate the possibility of taking Dylan on an overnight trip to the coast in June.  With countdown charts to the breaks in May and June, Dylan should hopefully find it easier to manage time.

When I saw Dylan last weekend he had the chart with him and seemed to be enjoying crossing off the days. Back at his care home he requested tape to fasten the chart to his cork board, next to his weekly programme (as in the photo above). Dylan didn’t seem as anxious about his schedule when I left and needed less reassurance than the previous week about the ‘sea’ and  ‘cottage’ (I am trying to play down the issue of a ‘boat’). When I telephoned for an update last night I was told Dylan has been calm and happy all week and that the chart seems to have helped.

The red book

Perhaps, as Dylan’s understanding of time develops, he will need new strategies for managing it? Something which seemed to help Dylan in the past was his filofax. Although this didn’t have countdown charts and schedules in it, Dylan used it as an ‘object of reference’ for the management of time. He was aware, for example, that it contained the key information and cards he needs to access the activities he enjoys. He carried his filofax everywhere and would bring it to us if he wanted to request an activity. The filofax seemed to be such an important part of Dylan’s life, and so precious to him, that I was horrified when he destroyed it one night when he was anxious and upset about something which the support staff, on that occasion, were unable to fathom.

Since then, we have used a notebook to keep records and pass messages between home and care home. Dylan knows these notebooks have replaced his filofax and he keeps them in the same place, but he has never had quite the same attachment to them. Last weekend I noticed we had filled the last page of his current book so I suggested to Dylan that we go to the store to get a new one.  We went to a large Office Supplies shop where Dylan bought his filofax three years ago. As I picked up various notebooks  Dylan pushed my hand back towards the shelf in his ‘put it back, I’m not interested’ gesture. This continued all the way up the aisle. Then Dylan escorted me to the filofax section where, after consideration, he picked one out.  I suggested some alternatives but he wasn’t having it; Dylan hugged the red book to his chest as if to stop me from taking it from him.

Anxious Times

Dylan stood the empty frame in its usual place when he came home…

I hesitated about  buying the filofax for Dylan because it was upsetting when he destroyed the other one – not just for those who care for Dylan, but for Dylan himself. Dylan only ever destroys things which matter to him; he seems to self-regulate,  at times of high anxiety, by channelling his emotion through meaningful objects.  So although we have made  various ‘ripping’ resources available to Dylan, it is his favourite books and DVDs he tears when he is anxious. This means the aftermath of these events is upsetting for Dylan as he realises the loss of things which were important to him.

Dylan tearing possessions to self-regulate could be seen as a positive development in that he used to tear people’s ears when he was anxious, something which he now does only rarely. As the cycle of destroy-replace became increasingly entrenched, however, it no longer felt like a practical strategy. Recently, I’ve been experimenting with not replacing the things which Dylan rips.  This has been partly effective in that Dylan hasn’t been tearing books and DVDs as he used to. What it has meant, however, is that his focus sometimes switches to other things.

I was devastated, a few weeks ago, to hear that Dylan had torn the photo of his Gran during an incident.  Like filofaxgate, it was the sort of event that was difficult to fathom. Why? Dylan loved that photograph. He kept it by his bed, took it on overnight trips and carried it with him at times of emotional need (or at least that’s how I perceived it). It was, as far as I was concerned, the most precious of his possessions (greater than even his filofax had been) and therefore immune from danger at times of distress. Well, I turned out to be wrong about that. When I told my daughter she was upset (for Dylan) and cross (with me). She reminded me that the photograph had belonged to her, originally. Don’t give Dylan photos of my Gran if you don’t have copies of them, she said.

Changing Times

The ‘duplicate’ of the one Dylan chose…

So the following weekend, when I found Dylan with a photograph of mum he had snaffled from my room, I took it from him:  That picture of your Gran belongs to mummy, I said. The next day I went through old albums.  I didn’t have the time or energy to make copies right now (a  project for retirement maybe) but  I found some ‘duplicates’ – photos where another was taken soon after, so there is hardly a difference between the shots. I made an album of these, and some other photos, and showed them to Dylan. Would he like to choose one to keep, I asked?

I was surprised by Dylan’s choice. It is an aerial shot of me and Dylan on a beach in Dorset, taken in 2007. We are absorbed in the pebbles and too far away for Dylan and I to be ‘subjects’ in the photo (unlike the photo of his Gran, which was a portrait shot).  Presumably he chose this picture because it reminds him of a happy time?  I liked the fact that Dylan replaced the photo of his Gran with something quite different. There is a sense in which it represents him moving on, perhaps; finding new ways of using the past to help manage the present.

About Time

When I collected Dylan last weekend he wasn’t wearing his trademark Breton hat.  I was shocked. Dylan is never  without that hat; it stays fixed to his head when he is out of the house and he is very good at looking after it. Where is your hat, Dylan? I asked. He hasn’t ripped it, has he? I asked the member of staff who was with him. She didn’t know. In fact she hadn’t noticed that Dylan didn’t have it.  But now I had mentioned it, Dylan was on it:  lost it, he said, lost it.  Then:  find it, find it. 

We checked Dylan’s drawers and cupboards and the cars and rooms of other residents.  I drove to the pub where Dylan had been for lunch the previous day. The hat could not be found. Why don’t you wear a different hat for now, I said to Dylan, giving him a choice of three caps from his cupboard.  He chose a green one.  I’ll sort it out for you I promise, I said to Dylan.  I was telling the support worker that I had brought the lost hat back from Brittany and that Dylan had bought his first Breton cap in St Malo when we were on holiday in 2013, when I noticed Dylan looking at me as if he was listening to the conversation (as I think he quite often does).  Hey  Dylan, I said, perhaps we should go to Brittany next year and get you another hat? Boat, Sea, Cottage I thought to myself as I said this.  Dylan rolled his eyes as if to say About time.

No More Moons

Dylan and I usually go away twice a year, at Easter and during the Summer. For the first time ever, we didn’t have a holiday at Easter this year. I wasn’t sure whether Dylan would notice but he was clearly disappointed.  Although time is not an easy concept for Dylan he makes associations with key events through the year and keeps track of it. So when I gave Dylan his Easter Egg he looked at me and said ‘cot’ quizzically. He was, I realised, asking me when we would be setting off to a holiday cottage. ‘Not this year, Dylan’ I said.  ‘Boat?’ he asked, hopefully.

I hadn’t booked a cottage (or boat) for Easter because I thought my marking might fall awkwardly  this year and that I would have to work through the break. In the event the students have only just submitted their assignments so I could have taken Dylan away after all. Perhaps next year I will. Meantime, I am experimenting with regular overnight trips instead;  the money that we would have spent on a week’s holiday I am planning to use across the year.  This should mean that I can take Dylan on a short break every six to eight weeks.  I will be curious to see whether ‘little and often’ is better for Dylan than less frequent longer breaks.

So last weekend Dylan and I went to Durham, a place he loves and which he has recently been ‘asking’ to visit again (‘asking’ involves Dylan collecting leaflets of things he is interested in and stacking these up in piles in his bedroom like ‘vouchers’). Conscious that the last time Dylan and I went on an overnight trip (visiting Brighton for his birthday) I  vowed never again to stay in a Premier Inn, I decided  this trip would be a good opportunity to try and extend Dylan’s repertoire.

I knew that moving Dylan from the Moon wouldn’t be easy. Dylan has been fixated on ‘Moon Hotels’ for years and staying in Premier Inns has been part of the raison d’être of our trips. Dylan adores the moon logo and enjoys  the familiarity of the purple branding and predictability of  facilities and services. The buffet breakfast (as much as he can eat of things he loves) is probably also part of Dylan’s love affair with Premier Inns 🙂 I figured that if we were going to stay somewhere different I needed to ensure it offered something the Premier Inn couldn’t; I wanted a hotel with compensating attractions. So I browsed the other hotel options with Dylan’s favourite places and activities in mind and opted for a hotel on the bank of the river which Dylan likes to walk, with a view of his beloved Cathedral.  I also had an Ace in my pocket:  the hotel had a swimming pool.

Staff at Dylan’s care home suggested that I show Dylan the hotel website and include a photo of it on his programme. This seemed to go well. The pool, in particular, captured Dylan’s attention and was the thing he talked about on the run-up to the trip; when he pointed to the photo of the hotel on his programme, the words he said were ‘pool’ and ‘swim’ rather than ‘bed’ and ‘moon’. So I set off for Durham optimistically, fairly confident we had prepared Dylan for the change of routine.

On arrival it was clear that  Dylan had  understood we would not be staying at the Premier Inn; he didn’t protest at all when I made a right rather than a left turn on the walk from the railway station. I had put a note on the hotel booking to say I would be supporting my autistic son and if we could be allocated a twin room with a decent amount of space between the beds that would be appreciated. I had also said that if there was any way we could have a room with a river view that would be fantastic, but that space was the priority.

In my experience such requests are frequently ignored; I have often had to return to reception to ask for an alternative room.  As for adding a note about dietary requirements (I am vegan) I have wondered why I bother.  So I was amazed, on arrival at the hotel, to find that we had been upgraded to a family room (lots of space) overlooking the River Wear and that there was a jug of soya milk in the room.  Dylan seemed to enjoy the space and the view from the window!

Food is very important to Dylan and, happily, dinner and breakfast met with his approval.  Best of all, however, was the pool.  I hadn’t scheduled it on Dylan’s programme as I needed to check it was safe and that I could supervise alone. This is important because Dylan is a non-swimmer with high risk behaviour around water: in the past, he has leapt into water fully clothed, waded out of his depth  and plunged underwater, attempting to stay below.  Fortunately, the hotel pool turned out to be ideal (it did occur to me that had I found otherwise it would have been very difficult to say no):  fairly small, not deep and quiet.  We spent a lovely hour in the water before breakfast on Sunday morning, an excellent way to start the day.

I had assumed that staying at a different hotel would be challenging for Dylan and that it would be important to maintain his other routines while we were in Durham. However, breaking the Moon habit seemed to loosen Dylan’s patterns more generally. So instead of having lunch in our usual café on  Saturday we tried a different  place. I was thrilled; the vegan options were much better and Dylan caught the spirit of adventure and had a Panini.  I am guessing this was a positive experience because he accepted a different café again the next day.

Dylan was also open to taking different routes around Durham,  changing the order in which we did some of his favourite things and trying new activities. So on this trip we walked further down the river path than we had previously and discovered Old Durham Gardens. Further on, we happened on a pub – this was just what we needed after a long walk on a sunny Saturday. Dylan enjoyed it so much I suspect future trips to Durham might involve a walk to the Rose Tree 🙂  Then, on the rainy Sunday, we looked around exhibitions at the Cathedral  and Palace Green Library, something we hadn’t done previously. Again, this was a great success with Dylan’s interest captured by the acoustics of the Great Kitchen and a collection of skulls and bones.

I will be interested to see if Dylan builds some of these places into a revised repertoire next time we are in Durham. Another visit might not involve the same hotel – although we got a good deal on the booking it was more expensive than usual and I don’t want Dylan to grow too accustomed to such facilities 🙂  However, I now have the confidence to try something different again if need be.

 

 

 

What have I learned from this experience?  That Dylan’s ‘routines’ are partly maintained and constructed by me.  Once he has enjoyed something, I tend to let him repeat the experience as it gives him pleasure.  This becomes a pattern that is familiar and dependable and which Dylan starts to recognise. However, he is dependent on me breaking these patterns as well as creating them and I should perhaps be more proactive in suggesting changes to routines. The memory of Dylan smiling and laughing on the train home should help me not to forget this 🙂

 

Mother

Dylan missed being born on Mother’s Day, in 1994, by 21 minutes.  “Hurry up”, the midwife said to me towards the end of my 72 hour labour “or you won’t get a mother’s day baby.”  I wanted it to be over but I didn’t give a fig about Mother’s Day.  In more than 30 years,  I’d given my mother no more than a handful of cards to mark the day. I wasn’t the sort of person who cared about such things.

I care now I’m a mother myself of course. I love it when Dylan gives me a gift on Mother’s Day. This year, it was the most glorious bunch of roses: pink, lemon, cream, peach, apricot and white.  Yesterday (more than two weeks since Mother’s Day) I said to a member of staff at Dylan’s home: “the roses Dylan gave me have been amazing: I still have a few in a jug”.

As I threw the last stems out this morning I wished I’d given roses to my mum more often.

*

Dylan and I drove to Brighton on Mother’s Day to celebrate his 24th birthday.  We hadn’t been back since we left when Dylan was six months old but this year things fell auspiciously for a return visit to the town where he was born.

Firstly, Dylan has developed a passion for Premier Inns; an overnight stay in a different one, for his birthday, should go down a treat.  Secondly (by coincidence) it is the town where Dylan’s beloved ex-key worker now lives; if Dylan could meet up with E while we were there, that would be birthday happiness indeed.  And thirdly, my work commitments meant that (unusually) I could take a couple of days leave. For me it would be a welcome trip down memory lane; I wanted to find my old flat, by the sea, and piece together the life I’d lived.

This would be a joint and double celebration then: something for both of us.

*

What I hadn’t bargained for was my mother.  I didn’t connect her with the trip at all but as soon as we arrived I was ambushed by memories. Although she and I hadn’t been particularly close, mum stayed in Brighton with me after Dylan was born. This wasn’t planned; she had only meant to visit while her first grandchild made its arrival. But I didn’t have a clue how to look after the baby and when she realised this mum asked for leave from her job in a school so she could stay on for a couple of weeks.

Although mum and I hadn’t spent much time together previously we got along just fine. Full of tact and diplomacy, she was the ideal mother of the child’s mother. Her presence was empowering; she suggested ways of taking care of Dylan but always left it up to me to decide.  We had a lot of fun together taking the baby out for the first time and hanging out in my airy flat in the sky. I remember how she loved the sound of the gulls and the sea at the end of the avenue.

When the day came for her to leave I didn’t want her to go.

*

I had taken ‘Baby’s First Photo Album’ to Brighton hoping it might help me to explain to Dylan that we had once lived there.  I’m not sure Dylan understands that he is the baby in the photographs or, indeed, that he was once a baby himself. Babies hold a special terror for Dylan; he hates the sound of them crying and is made very anxious by their presence. So Dylan has not really been interested in looking at photo records of his early life.  Knowing Dylan’s interest in matching images, however, I thought he might pay attention if I could recreate the photographs while we were there.

So when we arrived at our Premier Inn, on Mother’s Day evening, I flicked through the album for a photo to take with us on a short walk along the seafront before dinner.  Surely I had a picture of the stretch between the town centre and Hove, where we had lived?  The ones I found were of Dylan’s first day at the beach; according to the inscription on the back he was one week old when mum and I took turns to push him along the front. “Look Dylan”, I said, “you and your Gran.”

This year, on Mother’s Day, I celebrated my mother and me, by the sea.

*

“I have become my mother” I said to my friend R over coffee next day.  I’d suggested meeting a poet friend and his partner for a walk while Dylan and I were in town. It was a cold, wet day and we’d retreated to a cafe for coffee and cake.  “I wear my hair longer than she kept hers but otherwise we look the same, right down to our coats of green”.  OK, mine is lime and hers was emerald. But even so…

Dylan was twitchy, asking when he would see E, so I kept him moving through the rainy day. But everywhere we went I found my mum; we rode the carousel and the ghost train on the pier and I remembered her with an ice cream, fending off a gull. In the Brighton Lanes I recalled her buying gifts to take back for a colleague and her Head. Even when Dylan and I went to ride the brand new i-360 (where mum could not possibly be) I heard her voice in my ear, telling me how much she loves this town, how comfortable she feels here.

And then, of course, she was waiting for us at my old flat.

*

“Smile, Dylan” I said.  “Let mummy take just one more”.  Dylan grimaced at me in the rain. I put my arms together and rocked them. “When you were a baby”,  I said, “this is where mummy and Dylan lived. Mummy and Dylan the baby lived here in this house”. I pointed up at my top floor flat. It looked shabbier than I remembered but just as lovely. “We were  very happy here”,  I told Dylan. “And your Gran stayed with us and helped mummy to look after you.”  Dylan tugged at me.  It was past lunch time…

The thing is (I thought to myself as we walked down the Western Road looking for somewhere Dylan- and vegan-friendly to eat) things were different then.  Were they? What was different? Actually, the place seemed remarkably unchanged.  I couldn’t find my beloved Sanctuary Cafe and the sea front had been tidied up a bit, but these were superficial changes. Other than the i-360, it was all pretty much as I remembered.  So what was the thing? I grew sad. The cafe I had decided would be OK had been awful. The rain was falling slantwise.  I was cold and exhausted.  I felt as old as my mother. “Mummy’s tired, Dylan”, I said. “Let’s go back to the hotel. You will see E later. I promise you.”

What was different, I realised, is that I didn’t know Dylan was autistic then.

*

Caring for Dylan is as natural, now, as breathing.  My mum taught me how to look after a new born baby and I learned, from Dylan, how to take care of my autistic son.  Our six months in Brighton, 24 years ago, seemed suddenly unreal; I had been in a bubble then, my eyes fixed on a thin blue line between sea and sky. Today, I couldn’t even see the horizon. I wanted to cry but I said “Dylan, let’s buy an umbrella then go and find E.”

By coincidence, it is E’s birthday as well as Dylan’s. In the pub where we have arranged to meet they exchange gifts. Dylan beams at the fiddle toys she gives him and gazes at her, unbelieving. Here is another thing for Dylan to process; just as he has a past, here, so E has a present. ‘Time’ is a difficult concept for Dylan and his birthday trip has been full of its knottiness. On the way back to our hotel afterwards, I find more knots: the number 7 bus passes the hospital where Dylan was born and where, four months later, he would spend a week on a drip, being treated for meningococcal  septicemia.

I push it out of my head:  some questions are too difficult to ask.

*

The next morning is the bluest of blues.  After breakfast we walk down to the beach.  The thin line at the edge of the world is so clear I imagine the ships could tumble off.  I watch Dylan throw stones into the sea. He concentrates hard on this for 40 minutes, testing the arc of his arm against the waves. I read some poems, try to make out the avenue where we lived, away in the distance. I think of mum and Dylan and feel part of a chain, a piece of their history.

“Let’s go back to the hotel and get our bags”, I say. “Then find a birthday cake to take home.”  There was almost a meltdown but I somehow managed to head off Dylan’s disappointment at not being able to strike out along the seafront, explore some more, and his intense frustration at the broken slush machine at the end of the pier.  As I steered Dylan away from potential triggers, and toward the sublime joy of a Rainbow Unicorn Cake, I realised Brighton was no longer my rinky-dink town;  the place belonged to Dylan too.

“But”, I said to Dylan as we left; “I am never staying in a Premier Inn again”.
*

It was a particularly grotty Premier Inn (though the staff were lovely).  I know Dylan adores this chain but I really think I have reached my limit. Suggestions for moving Dylan on to alternatives gratefully received 🙂

 

 

 

The Key

berrien-2016-047This week is the start of the academic year in England; pretty soon I will be deep in teaching. Although September no longer marks a transition point for Dylan I don’t think I will ever lose the anxiety that the end of summer brings for parents of children with disabilities. Each year I would live on my nerves through the first weeks of term, hoping desperately that all would be well.

It is three years, now, since Dylan left school. That was the hardest end of summer ever; my nerves burned for months. Happily, Dylan is settled at last and can live his life without such difficult jags of time; there are no sudden changes to the year’s rhythm, or inexplicable annual endings, in his residential setting. There is a reassuring continuity to Dylan’s life.

berrien-2016-046That’s not to say there aren’t changes; periodically something disrupts a routine or we deliberately introduce a new pattern to Dylan’s week. The last time I posted an update here, for example, I was anticipating taking a holiday without Dylan. I fretted terribly about the proposed trip, concerned that Dylan would be upset by my absence, but he was absolutely fine.

The key to this, I’m sure, was the extended timetable the care home staff made for Dylan. Instead of a weekly programme Dylan had a schedule which ran for the time I was away, ending with the day he would see me again. Dylan also had a weekly ‘overview’ schedule so that he could count the sleeps until his next visit home.  It didn’t seem to matter to Dylan that the gap between my visits was longer as long as he knew he would see me again.

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13901449_293441187680481_5004186233514663936_nI’m really glad that I took that ‘next step‘ during the summer. I had a fantastic week in Brittany and relaxed into the different pace of time without Dylan. Some of the things that my girlfriend and I did Dylan would also have enjoyed, but I was able to linger over them in a way that hasn’t been possible in the past: a Chagall exhibition in Landerneau; a beach day at Poul-Rodou; a folk festival in Plomodiern; cycling on the Isle de Batz. I returned from holiday this year refreshed instead of exhausted.

I missed Dylan of course. I kept his timetable close by me and checked it each day to see what he was doing. Initially I talked about him a lot. In fact on the drive down to Portsmouth for the ferry I must have come close to driving my friend away with my talk of Dylan. That journey was terrible for me. I was in such a state of anxiety about leaving Dylan I had made myself ill: my stomach was in knots and I had a dreadful sense of foreboding. My friend let me talk or not as I needed. Having her to support and encourage me was probably key to my being able to take the step at all.

wp_20160821_006I’m not sure how patient she would have been with me had I continued to talk so much about Dylan during the week. At some point in the Channel , however, I felt the knots in my stomach loosen and my anxiety lift. The sun was shining. We were on deck. I could sit and read Zola and drink tea, as I had dreamed of doing. And so the week continued; while we were in France I made only one phone call to Dylan’s care home and sent just one email.

The email was to ask staff what size Dylan’s head was.  The last time he and I were in Brittany he bought a Breton cap which he has worn constantly since and I wanted to get a new one for him, as a gift. He looked a bit puzzled when I gave it to him on my arrival home, as he did about the Breton biscuits which had mysteriously appeared in the house.  I think he pieced things together when he saw my photos from the holiday, however. Usually Dylan looks through photos from our trips with great interest but I’d describe his interest in my pictures from Brittany as ‘passing’. So mummy had been away without him.  He ate the biscuits. He put on his cap…

*

berrien-2016-025Dylan’s care home manager told me she thought parents should take a holiday, even if it causes separation anxiety. I understand that now.  It is important for parents of disabled children and adults to have a complete break, not just from caring but from thinking about themselves as care-givers.  And, I remind myself, learning how to be apart from your adult child is part of learning how to be a parent. In this respect the experience of a parent of a disabled adult is not dissimilar to the experience of any parent;  I was also anxious about being far from my daughter when she lived in France.

There is  something about being away from a disabled child or adult which can provoke particular anxiety, however.  Their vulnerability and dependence on others means you need to have complete confidence in the people caring for your son or daughter.  I feel lucky that Dylan is finally living somewhere I can put my trust in others.  This week I’ve been thinking a lot about how we make such decisions.  How do we figure out levels of confidence in someone? Is there a science to it? Do ticks on a checklist really reassure us?  Parents of children with disabilities spend their lives making difficult decisions about care provision,  but how we make them – well, that’s something I’m not absolutely certain of.

As well as the checklist there is surely something magical to this? Call it intuition, if you will. Something in your guts, perhaps. An unknotting.  Sense of lightness. Je ne sais quoi.  I’ve written about this before; how some of the critical decisions I’ve made about Dylan’s care have been based on something entirely irrational magical. And this week it struck me that I’ve been relying on such seventh sense since Dylan was born. Because, as a single working parent, I had to go back to work when Dylan was only a few weeks old so needed to find someone to look after him. I was pretty clueless about the berrien-2016-088 process; I didn’t know how to care for babies and certainly had no system for figuring out how to choose a childminder. But someone very special came into our lives and I was able to get back to work – which some days meant working a distance from Dylan – with the complete confidence which comes from knowing you trust someone else to care for your child.

Blogs can be wonderful can’t they? I was so thrilled to find a message on mine last week from Dylan’s first childminder 🙂 I moved away from the area quite soon after Dylan was born but Tan has remained a precious memory. She was a key person, perhaps, because she made my first difficult separation from Dylan not just possible but positive. I think that is probably also an accurate description of my experience this summer.

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berrien-2016-153The thing about key people is that they tend to be transitory:  children outgrow childminders;  parents move away; friends move on.  I can add something else now:  care workers get promoted.  Dylan’s key worker will be moving onto a new role next month so one of the things we will be discussing at his annual review this week is her replacement. E has been a fantastic key worker; she has developed a great relationship  with Dylan and has been instrumental in developing critical aspects of his care, particularly around communication and behaviour support. Although I was sad to hear Dylan would be losing her as his key worker, I can’t say I was surprised. Key people are special people and if they are young,  gifted and ambitious they inevitably get promoted 🙂   The only question in my mind had been when and to where she would move.

Happily, the promotion is within the organisation so Dylan will still have occasional contact with E. I am telling myself that Dylan was lucky to have her as his key worker during his first year in a residential home; E has helped him to settle in and created a system of care around Dylan which should ensure continuity. As the message from Dylan’s first childminder reminds me, we keep people in our hearts and minds long after they have moved on: I’m sure Dylan will not forget.

One of the many things I love about Dylan is his capacity to form deep  relationships.  He has his own magical system for deciding whether to trust someone; I’ve seen Dylan reject some people entirely while embracing others with utter loyalty and commitment.  The transparency of Dylan’s affections means I am confident his ‘voice’ will be heard in the process of selecting a new key worker.

berrien-2016-104There are, of course, no promotion opportunities for parents; it is a role for life, with no possibility of moves up, down or sideways.  While that means there is no escaping the temporary anxiety of being far from your child, from time to time, it also means you are their continuity; the birth rock on which their whole life pivots. So although I don’t care for Dylan on a daily basis now, and am no longer the only person who knows how to do this, I am the one with the long view, holding his narrative together. That, I tell myself, is a privileged position to be in.

*

A final key is for my daughter. She will turn 21 this week, a birthday we used to refer to as the  ‘key to the door’.  So this September I’m making wishes for both my children to walk  happily through their newly-opening doors …

 

Except for the photo of Dylan (looking uncertain in his Breton cap) the photographs were taken in Brittany in August.

The Next Step

Another Place July 2016 002This summer I’ve been taking Dylan on overnight trips to different locations instead of for a week’s holiday to one place.  Dylan loves staying in hotels and he responds well to variety so our summer trips have proved very successful so far. It also means that I am supporting Dylan for just 24 hours at a time which is sensible given that he is usually on 2:1 support ratios in the community. I love the time I spend with Dylan but it is demanding physically and mentally.

The overnight breaks have allowed me to take Dylan to places which are a little too far to travel to in a day but which we haven’t managed to visit from our previous holiday destinations. Recently we have enjoyed visits to Whipsnade Zoo and to see Anthony Gormley’s Another Place installation at Crosby Beach.  My aim is to sprinkle these trips across the summer so that Dylan and I are able to enjoy the equivalent of a week away together.

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Another Place July 2016 031Taking a holiday myself is something that has been on my ‘bucket list’ since Dylan moved to residential care.  Although I have had occasional weekends away over the years I’ve never been able to consider more than this. Once free of caring responsibilities, however, I still didn’t find it easy to contemplate. For the first half year I was focused on settling Dylan into his new home; as this involved regular visits there wasn’t the space for a break.  Since then I’ve managed to find all sorts of reasons not to go away: work; decorating; poems; money.  The usual excuses.

But sorting through drawers one day I found a voucher for ferry travel to France.  A few years ago, when Dylan was very anxious and his ‘challenging behaviour’ at its height, I decided to cancel a holiday. Although I had travelled alone to France with Dylan before, it didn’t seem wise that summer. The holiday company with whom I had booked the gîte weren’t sympathetic but Brittany Ferries didn’t hesitate to issue me with a voucher for replacement travel. I had filed it away, assuming it would be used when Dylan was settled enough to travel at some point in the future. Suddenly, it seemed, the future had arrived: the voucher was due to expire August 20th this year.

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Another Place July 2016 036Since Dylan has moved to residential care I’ve realised, and come to accept, that he needs more support than I can give. Dylan benefits from 2:1 support in the community and responds positively to a ‘fresh face’ at times of anxiety; having access to more than one adult, so that a support worker can be strategically swapped, is good for Dylan and a more positive experience for his carer(s). These are things which aren’t possible  when supporting Dylan alone. This is partly why I’m limiting the time I am in sole charge of him this summer and explains why, with some sadness, I have decided that it’s not possible for me to take Dylan to France by myself again.

But what to do about the voucher? Without it I would probably have hummed my way through the summer, fiddling with paint and trying to write a poem. It pained me, however, to sacrifice those ferry crossings. So oh joy and delight when a girlfriend declared she would be happy to put up with accompany me to Brittany for a week. Fantastic. We agreed easily on a location and gîte. Figuring out the crossings and bicycle rack was a bit trickier but we worked it out. What I was especially looking forward to, I told my friend, was reading on the ferry.  During Channel crossings with my children I had watched others doing this and hankered after such space. Instead of having to hire a cabin for meltdowns and timeouts, and be on high alert, this time I could relax with a book.

*

Another Place July 2016 043Planning the holiday wasn’t all plain sailing, however. In fact I had a whole bag of worries about it which I discussed at length with the manager of Dylan’s residential home.  How would Dylan manage the longer than usual gap between my visits? What would we tell him and how? If there was an emergency, how would I be contacted? What if I couldn’t be contacted? These might be quotidian worries but they are not insignificant in the context of autism where happiness depends so much on reassuring routines.

Facing these anxieties and challenges seemed to be a necessary next step in the transition process, however.  The parents of other residents, I was told, had experienced similar anxieties the first time they had left their son or daughter in order to take a holiday by themselves. The staff would keep Dylan busy while I was away, I was assured, and make sure that his favourite activities were scheduled.  Confident that I had considered the situation from all angles, I booked the trip.

*

Another Place July 2016 040What I hadn’t factored in, however, was Daesh.  As the attacks in Europe increased in frequency and scope, the possibility of being caught in a random act of violence ratcheted up my anxiety. Rather than worrying about how Dylan would cope with my temporary absence, I started to consider the implications of my not coming back at all. The scenario was awful but not unthinkable. We are more likely to be victims of a traffic accident, my friend pointed out, especially on the wrong side of the road. She was right. Why then was Daesh increasing my anxiety about being away from Dylan?

Having a dependent child or adult to care for makes us feel vulnerable. In such a situation there can be a tendency to become risk-averse, as I explore in this post. But what are the implications for autistic children and adults at times of conflict? I reflected on some possibilities in this post and in this book review.  When I wrote those posts, not so very long ago, the war in Syria felt like news from another country. Now, suddenly, it involves us all.

*

Another Place July 2016 039I thought I’d let you know, I told Dylan’s care home manager, that I’m having second thoughts about my trip to France. I probably would go, I told her, but I was trying to think through the implications of the recent attacks.  I needed to be comfortable with my decision, I explained, or else I wouldn’t be able to relax. Earlier that day I’d watched a public information video about what to do in the event of  a ‘terrorist attack’. The advice came down to this: Run, Hide, Tell.  I watched the video through trying to imagine how I’d follow the guidance if I were with Dylan. It made no reference to people with disabilities or the vulnerable. It seemed to assume we are all fit, agile, able-bodied and verbal.

It would be impossible to keep Dylan safe in such a situation. He wouldn’t follow an instruction to run. He doesn’t understand the concept ‘hide’. He would behave erratically and probably noisily, drawing attention to himself and others. One of the pieces of advice in the video is to always show yourself to be empty-handed, particularly at point of rescue. This is important, apparently, because police might otherwise assume you are holding a weapon and mistake you for a terrorist. There is no way that I could persuade Dylan to show you his hands; in the community he hangs tight onto the arm of whoever is supporting him, burying his hands deep under their arms. If police are casting around for someone likely to be concealing a weapon, Dylan may well arouse their suspicion.

So I asked the care home manager what training staff had received for managing a ‘critical incident’ while supporting a resident in the community. Was this covered as part of  staff training? And given the current level of anxiety among the general public, were staff aware that the erratic behaviour of a resident might cause alarm and suspicion in the community? The manager assured me that staff had received training for explaining autistic behaviour to the general public but couldn’t, of course, allay my fears about a terrorist incident. I think we just have to get on with our lives, she said.

*

Another Place July 2016 004I’d been letting three things get in the way of me and Dylan living our lives: my anxieties about his ability to survive an incident; my concerns about my own safety given his dependence on me; and my worries about not being there for him.

But my response to these anxieties, I realised, had been what my daughter would call ‘cotton wool’.  Would you put that cotton wool back in your pocket? she asked me one day as I told her to take care on some play equipment. I suspect I’ve never quite taken the cotton wool from Dylan but I have, at least, learned to let go of it a bit since he moved to residential care.  But wrapping myself in cotton wool instead? I can only imagine what my daughter would say to that.

Happily, the friend I will be holidaying with understands these anxieties and has listened while I talk them through. Something I’ve found useful is identifying a practical response to an anxiety: things that we will and will not do while we are away, for example, and how we would travel home in an emergency. Such concrete plans feel  better than the softest of cotton wool – even if, in truth, they probably wouldn’t be much use. I suppose that’s also the point of Run, Hide, Tell

 

wishing you a safe and happy summer…

*

The photos of Anthony Gormley’s Another Place (on Crosby Beach) were taken by Liz, July 2016.

Small Steps Back, Big Leaps Forward

Picture1When I looked back in my diary last weekend I discovered it was exactly a year since Dylan went for his first night’s respite at the house where he now lives. Although he had spent occasional nights there during his time at a nearby National Autistic Society school, Dylan hadn’t had any contact with the setting since his transition to adult services. An escalation in ‘challenging behaviour’ after Dylan left school meant I had been unable to find a respite provider willing to accommodate him.  As Dylan had not therefore spent any time away from home for months,  it was with a mix of relief and trepidation that I dropped him off for an overnight stay a year ago.

I had spent over a year trying to identify a specialist provider able to support Dylan and after months of frustration and disappointment it seemed I had finally found the perfect place.  This felt like the last chance saloon though.  What if something went wrong and the key to the golden gate was withdrawn?  Reading last year’s diary entry reminded me of just how anxious I had been. I seem to have had two main concerns: whether staff would be able to keep themselves as well as Dylan safe if there was an incident and the potential  impact of the trial on Dylan’s proposed residential place.

If it is challenging and they see the full extent of D’s behaviours there could be a high risk situation… someone could get hurt and they could say  – I’m so sorry but we can’t possibly accommodate Dylan after all – we didn’t realise the extent of the CB.  So I need him to be good (but not too good). Well: breathe now, breathe. Try to relax. This is what I’ve been desperate for and needing. I have until tomorrow. Only tomorrow!!

Needless to say, that first overnight stay, and subsequent visits, went fine. There were some incidents but nothing the staff couldn’t handle or to cause concern. Dylan was just the sort of young man, the manager told me, their provision was aimed at. So he was  offered a place at the house and, as I commented to staff when I collected him last Saturday, his progress has been remarkable.  Dylan has settled well; he has developed some great relationships and seems to thoroughly enjoy his programme of activities. Although there are still incidents from time to time, Dylan’s anxiety levels are significantly reduced thanks to the specialist support he receives.

Dylan is doing so well in fact that he went away with staff on holiday at the beginning of this week. ‘I can hardly believe’, I said as I handed over Dylan’s trundle case at the weekend, ‘that it is only a year since Dylan’s first sleepover’.  If someone had told me, then, that just 12 months later Dylan would be doing this I would perhaps have breathed more easily. As Dylan hasn’t been on holiday without me before this is a significant step for him. It represents a pretty big leap for me too though. At the weekend I realised I had left Dylan’s suitcase for staff to pack without feeling the need to also provide a list of instructions and details of what Dylan should pack. This  didn’t so much as cross my mind:  I trust the staff to care for Dylan and accept I am no longer the only one who knows what he needs.

*

89a02f168afcaab595550196bc3871bbThe Log Cabin on the coast which Dylan’s care provider have rented is being shared across the week by the residents at the home. The young people take turns to have a couple of days away, one by themselves and one shared with another resident; Dylan was first to go on Monday morning and he was joined  the next day by another young man who took Dylan’s place in the cabin on Tuesday night.  Apparently Dylan had a lovely time and thoroughly enjoyed himself.

I say ‘apparently’ because I am, of course, dependent on reports from others. I did glimpse Dylan, briefly, on his return from the short break as ‘Facetime with mum’ was on his programme that evening. Facetime, however, hasn’t been very popular with Dylan recently.  The days of kissing the screen appear to be over.  In the last couple of weeks Dylan has clutched his ears, closed his eyes, moaned softly and walked out of view during our calls.  ‘We might want to step back a bit with Facetime’, I suggested to the activities coordinator: ‘Dylan doesn’t seem very comfortable’.

Parents and professionals will perhaps recognise this pattern of engagement and disengagement; Dylan quite often appears OK with something initially but then decides it’s not for him after all (and vice versa). This delayed reaction is typical for Dylan who, like many autistic children and adults, needs extra processing time for new experiences. Consequently, it can take a while for Dylan’s authentic response to a situation or activity to become clear. I should know this by now; my rejoicing about Facetime was almost certainly premature.

51b5dd798d9adbf39a1b93ded520d811So when I got an email last week asking whether I thought Dylan would like to join an early evening running group, and if so would I mind rearranging our Facetime session, I jumped at the suggestion.  Physical exercise is one of the best ways of involving Dylan in community activities and I loved the idea he could take part in a fun run with staff from the home and members of the public. That would be great, I replied, and no problem at all about the Facetime session.

When staff tried to do a ‘Programme Change’ , however, Dylan wasn’t happy. He pointed repeatedly to the Facetime icon, insisting it be reinstated. I was surprised by this, having convinced myself he wasn’t enjoying the sessions. Maybe in his own way he looked forward to them? Had I been too quick to make assumptions? How could I be sure Dylan’s behaviour meant he didn’t enjoy Facetime? So we decided to leave Dylan’s programme as it was and schedule the running to start this week instead. Come the Facetime session, however, it was a struggle to stay positive; you would never have guessed, from Dylan’s reaction, that he wanted it on his schedule.

c15611269b52da129a0117ce6b4065ddAs Facetime is fundamentally about communication maybe it is no surprise that Dylan should feel anxious. Although it is visual, Facetime still requires direct interaction in that it demands a face and assumes speech.  For Dylan, for whom eye contact and voices provoke anxiety, this is not ideal.  During one session, realising that Dylan was uncomfortable, I fell silent and started making simple actions: putting my tongue out, touching my nose, pulling a funny face. After a while I had Dylan’s attention.  Gradually he started to copy some of my actions. I heard Dylan’s support worker laughing at us (in a nice way). It felt a bit weird but it was probably the most relaxed I’ve seen Dylan on Facetime recently.

So I haven’t wanted to give up on  Facetime too quickly in case it is something we only need to tweak. Maybe we are scheduling it at an irritating time of day when Dylan is wanting to do something else? Or perhaps we need to move it to another area of the home where Dylan is less distracted? Maybe Dylan and I will develop a silent Facetime language. I would be sorry to lose Facetime as I find it more comfortable than the telephone. At the moment, therefore,  I am asking whoever is supporting Dylan to chat to me, rather than try to involve Dylan – perhaps watching from the sidelines will be enabling for Dylan. I’m not sure what will happen next.  Perhaps we’ll knock it on the head for a while. It feels like a step back, but only a small one.  And who knows – the running group could be a big stride forward.

*

‘I have to accept that there will be setbacks’, I told myself on Sunday as I sat alone in a cafe over a bowl of soup, wondering what to do with my unexpected free time.  The battery on my phone had inconveniently died so I couldn’t phone a friend to ask if I could visit or we could meet.  I tried to stay positive while I re-thought the rest of my day. Because, for the first time in the year since Dylan had moved to a residential home, which only the previous morning I had been rejoicing, I had telephoned staff to ask if I could return him earlier than scheduled.

9235c2ffd9004f1f6c76b96e9579c75bThere had been an incident and I had decided it probably best to abandon our planned activity.  So I had dropped Dylan off at the home before lunch on Sunday, rather than at the end of the day, and was pondering my next move from a nearby cafe. I’d probably been undone by my own hubris that morning, I reflected. I had been too relaxed.  I had taken my eye off the ball. I had forgotten that with Dylan I must be vigilant and prepared for the unexpected. It was good to be reminded of this, I told myself –  and lucky that it had been in such a safe environment.

I had taken Dylan to an Autism-Friendly screening of Angry Birds at an out of town multi-screen entertainment centre which Dylan has been to numerous times.  Dylan doesn’t need to go to inclusive screenings any more as he is a seasoned cinema goer and understands the routine. I like to support AF initiatives, however, and as the film was at a convenient time and location I had suggested to Dylan that we go before lunch out and an afternoon walk.

I had a relaxed swagger about me as I helped Dylan to use his CEA card to buy his ticket and queue for his salty popcorn and water. I bought a cup of coffee. I was aware of parents of young autistic children doing what I had needed to do with Dylan years ago: encouraging them into line; helping them to wait and to choose appropriately; supporting them through terrors and tears and mini meltdowns; picking up and carrying or patiently waiting. I probably let myself feel glad that my young man was quietly waiting to be served, behaving beautifully.

cd4c980c1b4e1978ed7fc085e53e708aAnd then it kicked off.  The film wasn’t in the cinema Dylan wanted it to be in (up the escalator). He became an Angry Bird. I saw, in the split second before Dylan did it, what was about to happen: backpack off, frog-jump as high as he could manage, popcorn falling everywhere, like snow, and then Dylan squirming in it, on the floor, yelling in anger.  The staff had clearly had autism awareness training and were prepared; they appeared with brushes and pans and a ‘hazard’ sign, asked me whether it had been sweet or salty (for  a replacement) and what they could best do to support me.

I said that Dylan could sweep it up himself – that it was important that he did – and that I wasn’t sure I wanted him to have replacement popcorn.  So, to the staff’s surprise, I got Dylan to help them clear up. Was there another way into the cinema I wondered? Could we go up the escalator and enter through a back door? But there wasn’t. I wasn’t convinced that I was going to get Dylan into the cinema but thought I would try again and agreed he could have more popcorn. When I told Dylan again, however, that the film was on the ground floor, he prepared to repeat the popcorn party trick. At the very  moment he bent his knees to propel himself into the air I slipped the carton out of his fingers. ‘I think we’ll leave’, I said to the member of staff, as  I escorted Dylan from the cinema, shouting and waving his arms, still pointing to the escalator.

Should I have let him go upstairs? Maybe. Perhaps he only wanted to ride it and would have come back downstairs for the film. I doubt it though. I suspect more likely is that he had a particular auditorium  in mind. I decided I couldn’t take the risk of letting Dylan head upstairs to find myself with a more difficult situation to manage on the mezzanine. Leaving the cinema, however, had made me feel sad;  going to a film together is something we have done for years and a shared activity I have loved. I couldn’t guarantee a film would be showing in a particular auditorium for Dylan.  Were our cinema trips in jeopardy? Was this something else to lose?

WP_20160607_005When I dropped Dylan off at his residential home a member of staff told me I had done exactly as they would by encouraging Dylan to sweep up the mess and then changing the activity. And, she suggested, I might not have to give up cinema trips altogether, just avoid the multi-screen  for a while. Still, I sat staring into my soup, feeling disappointed not just about the day but the  loss of future days. How could I possibly take Dylan to the cinema again, I wondered? It hadn’t occurred to me before that a trip to the cinema might be as much about the auditorium and environment as the film itself for Dylan. I searched through all my cinema memories, asking myself how many times we had been upstairs and how many downstairs. Which films had we watched in which auditorium? I knew Dylan usually headed for particular seats. Now I realised that this varied by auditorium; in one cinema it is row F on the far right, in another it is row A on the far left and in another it is the very back row, far left. Perhaps that morning Dylan had wanted to sit on a particular seat rather than in a particular auditorium?

So I sat turning things over, trying to figure them out. But then I remembered my old diary entry. Instead of staring into my soup, I told myself, I should be enjoying the time I had to myself. A year ago I would have done anything for a bit of space on a Sunday. In the scale of things this was a small step back, after all, not a significant loss.  I had a book of poems in my bag, waiting to be read. And then I would go and look for that laburnum tree I had promised myself…

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The photographs of Dylan were taken by staff during his short break this week. I am really enjoying the laburnum tree which I planted outside my back door.