Emotes

Dylan turned 23 this month. To celebrate his birthday I took him to Chester for a short break. A trip to the zoo and an overnight stay in a ‘moon hotel’ was followed by a day walking the city walls and looking at the river, canals and cathedral. These are things which Dylan loves and we had a marvellous time.

This year I gave Dylan a remote-controlled car for his birthday. He has taken an interest in cars recently, pointing them out to me and saying ‘car’. His particular interest seems to be black taxi cabs but I couldn’t find one so he has a red saloon instead. Still, its headlights and rear lights flash and it moves left and right as well as forwards and back. It’s quite exciting but a bit tricky to manoeuvre so I’m not sure it will work for Dylan who could find it frustrating  (or pointless).

I didn’t have a particular gift in mind for Dylan this year so I looked around a ‘gifts and novelties’ section of a department store for inspiration.  As well as the car, I picked out a ‘Gentleman’s Hardware’ picnic box which Dylan seems to be enjoying. He often takes a packed lunch on his trips out so this is something he’ll get lots of use out of. While I was in the store, my attention was also caught by a box of ‘Emotes’…

Because Dylan uses symbols to communicate I’m always on the look out for visual resources and the Emotes looked interesting. Essentially, the product is an emoticon glossary, presented as a card index: one side of the card has a picture of an emoticon and the reverse side carries a definition and explanation of use. A fun present for a social media junkie. I flicked through the cards in the box, embarrassed (by how much I had misunderstood) and  amused (pile of poo? really?).

I don’t text very much or use social media language. I understand happy and sad faces, and I include them in messages sometimes,  but that’s about my limit. I’m too scared of making a faux pas after spending years thinking that ‘lol’ meant ‘lots of love’ and wondering why people I hardly knew kept sending it to me. Now, I try and avoid inserting funny faces into my emails and texts.

But while I could clearly learn things from the cards, it wasn’t really myself I was thinking about. Could the emotes help Dylan to understand his emotional life and communicate his feelings, I wondered? Some of the Emotes are the same as makaton signs so would be reassuringly familiar, but there were symbols that might develop nuance and range. Here is worried for example, an emotion which I think Dylan experiences quite frequently:

And this is confused:

Although I spend most of my time encouraging Dylan to find his voice, there are times when this might be useful:

And there’s even a blank to create your own emote. I like the idea of leaving it empty, actually; having an option for not feeling anything strikes me as pretty useful. While the box includes some inappropriate cards (a gun), others would almost certainly amuse (that pile of poo)  or excite Dylan (piece of cake). The set cost £12.00.  I decided to buy one – not to gift wrap  (Dylan would probably think that a disappointing present) but to introduce as part of the on-going attempt to support Dylan’s communication.

I don’t think that, so far, they’ve been of much interest to Dylan.  When I showed them to him on his birthday he had a giggle at the pile of poo and put the picture of a piece of cake in the plastic stand. Fair enough – this was the bit of his day he was most looking forward to.  Dylan also enjoyed the ‘fist bump’ card and quickly grasped this as a greeting or alternative for ‘good job’. Two weeks later, Dylan is still fist-bumping me. The cake is still in the stand, however, and Dylan shows no interest in changing it or in looking at the other symbols. ‘Never say never’, is my mantra, however;  Dylan may pick them up one day.

I do think Emotes are a potentially useful resource for people (children or adults) who struggle to understand socio-emotional communication. And you don’t need to have an autism diagnosis to be in that category lol 🙂

At-Ankle Support

wp_20170205_013As I’ve mentioned previously, Dylan has a tendency to jump. When I say jump I really mean bounce. Or perhaps pogo is a more accurate description. Because Dylan’s jumping seems not to be to touch the sky (as Higashida explains this behaviour in The Reason I Jump) but to relieve extreme anxiety. There are happy exceptions, but Dylan’s jumping is mostly a sign that something in his world has gone wrong.

I’ve always been a little bit scared of Dylan’s jumping. It doesn’t sound threatening, I know. Jump.  Quite Innocuous really –  fun and friendly, even. But when someone is pounding up and down, over and over, higher and higher, bending at the knees to increase height and acceleration – well, in a restricted indoor space it is intimidating and outdoors, in a high risk environment, it can be terrifying (I will never forget a cliff top episode that nearly ended in tragedy).

Dylan’s jumping has been less of a concern since he moved to a specialised setting where his anxieties have reduced. When he needs to jump he has staff to support him and a safe environment. The rooms at the residential setting are larger than an average home environment and there is space for Dylan to jump in order to manage his anxiety. Because, as Dylan’s Behaviour Support Coordinator stresses, the behaviour is functional for Dylan; if his anxiety escalates then the sensory experience of rhythmic leaping into the air is something which Dylan seems to find helpful.

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wp_20170205_014But last week there was an accident; Dylan jumped so hard that he either landed awkwardly on his ankle or caught it on furniture. When I received an email to say that Dylan had hurt his ankle while  jumping I wasn’t surprised in the sense that a jumping-related incident has been an accident waiting to happen for years. I was a bit alarmed, however, by the severity of the injury and the implications for Dylan. It took several phone calls and emails to reassure me that I didn’t need to go rushing to the home to see Dylan myself; there was nothing I could do that wasn’t already being done to support him. And although the photograph of Dylan’s ankle was a bit of a shock, it was helpful .

We have become so used to exchanging images by email it’s easy to forget that this is still a recent development; a few years ago I would have had to drive to Dylan’s care home to see the situation for myself. Without doubt, new technologies are helpful in supporting communication between a residential setting and family home and thus in promoting an active partnership around care. Daily phone calls and email updates not only reassured me about Dylan’s injury, they enabled me to take an active part in discussions about how to support him with it.

Helping Dylan to manage pain and encourage healing is challenging as Dylan won’t take oral medicines and will tolerate only very limited interventions. Furthermore, Dylan is a very active young man who is constantly on-the-go. The ankle injury was therefore significant in that ‘resting it’ was not realistic; sitting quietly with his feet up was not something Dylan could understand or accept.  The doctor, however, advised that there were benefits to keeping an ankle moving after such an injury as some mobility promotes the healing process. It was really therefore a question of degree:  ice-skating on Friday would have to be cancelled but a brief walk around a favourite museum on Wednesday would be OK.

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wp_20170205_015Happily Dylan accepted the changes to his programme. He also tolerated the application of anaesthetic gel and a support bandage in the days after the injury. I think Dylan grasped some of the implications of his injury and perhaps even had a basic understanding of cause and effect in relation to the behaviour which had caused it. What I didn’t believe, however, was that this would be enough to prevent Dylan from jumping again. On the contrary, I suggested to staff, wasn’t it likely that Dylan would be more prone to jumping due to his frustration at the situation? As far as I was concerned, there was a real danger that Dylan would damage his already-weakened ankle by jumping on it. And even if he didn’t, I said to the care home manager, the incident had made me realise that we had to do something about Dylan’s jumping. I didn’t want this to happen again.

Although I was sorry that Dylan had to lose his fabulous first key worker recently, as E’s new role in the organisation is regional Behaviour Support Coordinator, Dylan still gets to benefit from her expertise. So when I asked for a review of Dylan’s jumping after the incident it was to E that Dylan was referred. The incident analysis which she conducted suggested patterns to Dylan’s jumping. This particular incident, for example, seems to have occurred when Dylan became frustrated about his swimming towel not being folded in a particular way. A newish member of staff wasn’t aware of the importance of this to Dylan who became frustrated at his inability to communicate how he wanted the towel folded. Tracking through Dylan’s records revealed other incidents when Dylan had become frustrated by a routine not being followed.

When Dylan chooses a jacket potato for lunch, for example, it is very important that two portions of butter are placed on the side of the plate (so he can put the butter on himself) rather than the potato being served with butter already added. Such details may seem minor to us but they can mean the difference between happiness and despair to Dylan. The thing is, E noted, she had got to know Dylan so well during her time as his key worker that she instinctively built Dylan’s routines into her care and modelled these to other staff with whom she was working.  Furthermore, members of staff who know Dylan well are familiar with the signs that he might be about to bounce and are often able to react in order to head off the jumping. There had, however, been a number of staff changes and some of this ‘craft knowledge’ of Dylan’s routines had been lost.

While Dylan’s basic care routines are recorded in his care plan there was perhaps a need, E suggested, to produce more detailed written guidance about Dylan’s context-specific routines. As the review of Dylan’s records had suggested that a significant number of Dylan’s jumping incidents happened around food choices, E suggested that Dylan’s communication book be enhanced so that he is more aware of what food options are likely to be available on a particular day. This might help Dylan to manage his expectations around meals, particularly in the community.

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wp_20170205_012Developing the details in Dylan’s care plan (for staff) and schedules (for Dylan) are strategies which focus on communication.   There is nothing surprising or new here; it has been clear from the beginning of bouncing that underneath the behaviour lies Dylan’s deep frustration at being unable to communicate his needs and desires. We rely so heavily on the spoken and written word to communicate that I imagine whatever we do and however much we try, we will never be able to take away Dylan’s frustration entirely.  As well as it being impossible to have pictures/symbols available for every eventuality (even digitally), Dylan’s significant intellectual disability means that he cannot always comprehend the nuance of communication through imagery.

Nonetheless, reviewing and developing the symbols we use with Dylan has to be worth our constant time and attention. E has some other ideas for communication which we hope will empower Dylan. She has suggested introducing a key ring system, for example, to promote independence.  Again, there is nothing radical about this  – I tried using a key ring with Dylan when he was around seven years old. But the point is to go at Dylan’s pace and to find methods with which he’s comfortable; some of the strategies I tried with Dylan as a child, without success, may be more effective now.

While some autistic children and adults are confident users of communication software, this hasn’t been something which has worked for Dylan so far. I suspect this is because of Dylan’s dual diagnosis of intellectual disability and autism, a combination which impacts significantly on communication and thus on Dylan’s life more generally.  As Dylan’s ankle injury demonstrates, this can affect physical health as well as emotional well-being.

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wp_20170205_011I’ve written previously about the importance of promoting positive contact with the health services for autistic children and adults with intellectual disability.  Happily, the annual ‘Cardiff Check’ seems to have borne fruit in that Dylan seems comfortable visiting doctor’s surgeries and hospitals, although he won’t tolerate much in the way of intervention.  Coincidentally, Dylan’s annual review was scheduled  last week so the GP was able to check his ankle during the appointment. It had been, the doctor suggested, ‘a very bad sprain’ but seemed to be healing nicely and he had no concerns.

My concerns that Dylan might damage his injured ankle by bouncing on it have, happily, not come to pass.  ‘I absolutely take your point about improving communication’, I had said to E after Dylan’s accident, ‘but what if Dylan does start to bounce? We need to be able to redirect him, at least while his ankle is injured’. E suggested that we encourage Dylan to make use of his exercise ball at such times; seated-bouncing on his ball, she explained, would deliver the rhythmic movement which Dylan appears to benefit from but the ball would take the impact of his weight rather than the floor. Staff could use a ‘Stop’ card with Dylan at the onset of bouncing and re-direct him to the exercise ball.  Longer term, the aim would be for Dylan to develop the habit of seated-bouncing rather than his standing leaps.

While Dylan’s ankle has been sore he has been happy to make more use of the exercise ball. Dylan uses such a ball as part of a morning exercise routine so it is a familiar piece of kit. Although this is not something which can be used outside the home, it feels positive as a strategy for promoting emotional self-regulation. The hope is that once Dylan has accepted re-direction to the exercise ball he will use it voluntarily, instead of jumping.  As he learns to manage his anxiety, staff will support Dylan to use other resources, such as his weighted blanket and a ‘sensory box’. This sensory approach makes sense to me; I bought an exercise ball for Dylan to use at home and I must confess to having bounced on it myself, one evening last week, after a particularly stressful day 🙂 As ever, there are self-care lessons to be learned from caring for Dylan.