Emotes

Dylan turned 23 this month. To celebrate his birthday I took him to Chester for a short break. A trip to the zoo and an overnight stay in a ‘moon hotel’ was followed by a day walking the city walls and looking at the river, canals and cathedral. These are things which Dylan loves and we had a marvellous time.

This year I gave Dylan a remote-controlled car for his birthday. He has taken an interest in cars recently, pointing them out to me and saying ‘car’. His particular interest seems to be black taxi cabs but I couldn’t find one so he has a red saloon instead. Still, its headlights and rear lights flash and it moves left and right as well as forwards and back. It’s quite exciting but a bit tricky to manoeuvre so I’m not sure it will work for Dylan who could find it frustrating  (or pointless).

I didn’t have a particular gift in mind for Dylan this year so I looked around a ‘gifts and novelties’ section of a department store for inspiration.  As well as the car, I picked out a ‘Gentleman’s Hardware’ picnic box which Dylan seems to be enjoying. He often takes a packed lunch on his trips out so this is something he’ll get lots of use out of. While I was in the store, my attention was also caught by a box of ‘Emotes’…

Because Dylan uses symbols to communicate I’m always on the look out for visual resources and the Emotes looked interesting. Essentially, the product is an emoticon glossary, presented as a card index: one side of the card has a picture of an emoticon and the reverse side carries a definition and explanation of use. A fun present for a social media junkie. I flicked through the cards in the box, embarrassed (by how much I had misunderstood) and  amused (pile of poo? really?).

I don’t text very much or use social media language. I understand happy and sad faces, and I include them in messages sometimes,  but that’s about my limit. I’m too scared of making a faux pas after spending years thinking that ‘lol’ meant ‘lots of love’ and wondering why people I hardly knew kept sending it to me. Now, I try and avoid inserting funny faces into my emails and texts.

But while I could clearly learn things from the cards, it wasn’t really myself I was thinking about. Could the emotes help Dylan to understand his emotional life and communicate his feelings, I wondered? Some of the Emotes are the same as makaton signs so would be reassuringly familiar, but there were symbols that might develop nuance and range. Here is worried for example, an emotion which I think Dylan experiences quite frequently:

And this is confused:

Although I spend most of my time encouraging Dylan to find his voice, there are times when this might be useful:

And there’s even a blank to create your own emote. I like the idea of leaving it empty, actually; having an option for not feeling anything strikes me as pretty useful. While the box includes some inappropriate cards (a gun), others would almost certainly amuse (that pile of poo)  or excite Dylan (piece of cake). The set cost £12.00.  I decided to buy one – not to gift wrap  (Dylan would probably think that a disappointing present) but to introduce as part of the on-going attempt to support Dylan’s communication.

I don’t think that, so far, they’ve been of much interest to Dylan.  When I showed them to him on his birthday he had a giggle at the pile of poo and put the picture of a piece of cake in the plastic stand. Fair enough – this was the bit of his day he was most looking forward to.  Dylan also enjoyed the ‘fist bump’ card and quickly grasped this as a greeting or alternative for ‘good job’. Two weeks later, Dylan is still fist-bumping me. The cake is still in the stand, however, and Dylan shows no interest in changing it or in looking at the other symbols. ‘Never say never’, is my mantra, however;  Dylan may pick them up one day.

I do think Emotes are a potentially useful resource for people (children or adults) who struggle to understand socio-emotional communication. And you don’t need to have an autism diagnosis to be in that category lol 🙂

7 thoughts on “Emotes

  1. I am useless. I wouldn’t even have known the fist bump card meant something positive! But symbols are incredibly important, aren’t they? I hope there’s one for thumbs-up as well. And tiny children ‘get’ a high five remarkably quickly, even though it took me decades to work out what it meant. I would so love him to generate his own emoticon on the blank page. But doing that is actually remarkably complex. Most of us wouldn’t quite know where to begin… 😉

    Liked by 1 person

  2. Happy birthday for Dylan, Liz. I loved the emoticon cards, and I guess they should be very useful, in fact. For sure Dylan will deal with them in his own time. A really great gift!

    Best regards

    Eder

    Liked by 1 person

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