Small Steps Back, Big Leaps Forward

Picture1When I looked back in my diary last weekend I discovered it was exactly a year since Dylan went for his first night’s respite at the house where he now lives. Although he had spent occasional nights there during his time at a nearby National Autistic Society school, Dylan hadn’t had any contact with the setting since his transition to adult services. An escalation in ‘challenging behaviour’ after Dylan left school meant I had been unable to find a respite provider willing to accommodate him.  As Dylan had not therefore spent any time away from home for months,  it was with a mix of relief and trepidation that I dropped him off for an overnight stay a year ago.

I had spent over a year trying to identify a specialist provider able to support Dylan and after months of frustration and disappointment it seemed I had finally found the perfect place.  This felt like the last chance saloon though.  What if something went wrong and the key to the golden gate was withdrawn?  Reading last year’s diary entry reminded me of just how anxious I had been. I seem to have had two main concerns: whether staff would be able to keep themselves as well as Dylan safe if there was an incident and the potential  impact of the trial on Dylan’s proposed residential place.

If it is challenging and they see the full extent of D’s behaviours there could be a high risk situation… someone could get hurt and they could say  – I’m so sorry but we can’t possibly accommodate Dylan after all – we didn’t realise the extent of the CB.  So I need him to be good (but not too good). Well: breathe now, breathe. Try to relax. This is what I’ve been desperate for and needing. I have until tomorrow. Only tomorrow!!

Needless to say, that first overnight stay, and subsequent visits, went fine. There were some incidents but nothing the staff couldn’t handle or to cause concern. Dylan was just the sort of young man, the manager told me, their provision was aimed at. So he was  offered a place at the house and, as I commented to staff when I collected him last Saturday, his progress has been remarkable.  Dylan has settled well; he has developed some great relationships and seems to thoroughly enjoy his programme of activities. Although there are still incidents from time to time, Dylan’s anxiety levels are significantly reduced thanks to the specialist support he receives.

Dylan is doing so well in fact that he went away with staff on holiday at the beginning of this week. ‘I can hardly believe’, I said as I handed over Dylan’s trundle case at the weekend, ‘that it is only a year since Dylan’s first sleepover’.  If someone had told me, then, that just 12 months later Dylan would be doing this I would perhaps have breathed more easily. As Dylan hasn’t been on holiday without me before this is a significant step for him. It represents a pretty big leap for me too though. At the weekend I realised I had left Dylan’s suitcase for staff to pack without feeling the need to also provide a list of instructions and details of what Dylan should pack. This  didn’t so much as cross my mind:  I trust the staff to care for Dylan and accept I am no longer the only one who knows what he needs.

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89a02f168afcaab595550196bc3871bbThe Log Cabin on the coast which Dylan’s care provider have rented is being shared across the week by the residents at the home. The young people take turns to have a couple of days away, one by themselves and one shared with another resident; Dylan was first to go on Monday morning and he was joined  the next day by another young man who took Dylan’s place in the cabin on Tuesday night.  Apparently Dylan had a lovely time and thoroughly enjoyed himself.

I say ‘apparently’ because I am, of course, dependent on reports from others. I did glimpse Dylan, briefly, on his return from the short break as ‘Facetime with mum’ was on his programme that evening. Facetime, however, hasn’t been very popular with Dylan recently.  The days of kissing the screen appear to be over.  In the last couple of weeks Dylan has clutched his ears, closed his eyes, moaned softly and walked out of view during our calls.  ‘We might want to step back a bit with Facetime’, I suggested to the activities coordinator: ‘Dylan doesn’t seem very comfortable’.

Parents and professionals will perhaps recognise this pattern of engagement and disengagement; Dylan quite often appears OK with something initially but then decides it’s not for him after all (and vice versa). This delayed reaction is typical for Dylan who, like many autistic children and adults, needs extra processing time for new experiences. Consequently, it can take a while for Dylan’s authentic response to a situation or activity to become clear. I should know this by now; my rejoicing about Facetime was almost certainly premature.

51b5dd798d9adbf39a1b93ded520d811So when I got an email last week asking whether I thought Dylan would like to join an early evening running group, and if so would I mind rearranging our Facetime session, I jumped at the suggestion.  Physical exercise is one of the best ways of involving Dylan in community activities and I loved the idea he could take part in a fun run with staff from the home and members of the public. That would be great, I replied, and no problem at all about the Facetime session.

When staff tried to do a ‘Programme Change’ , however, Dylan wasn’t happy. He pointed repeatedly to the Facetime icon, insisting it be reinstated. I was surprised by this, having convinced myself he wasn’t enjoying the sessions. Maybe in his own way he looked forward to them? Had I been too quick to make assumptions? How could I be sure Dylan’s behaviour meant he didn’t enjoy Facetime? So we decided to leave Dylan’s programme as it was and schedule the running to start this week instead. Come the Facetime session, however, it was a struggle to stay positive; you would never have guessed, from Dylan’s reaction, that he wanted it on his schedule.

c15611269b52da129a0117ce6b4065ddAs Facetime is fundamentally about communication maybe it is no surprise that Dylan should feel anxious. Although it is visual, Facetime still requires direct interaction in that it demands a face and assumes speech.  For Dylan, for whom eye contact and voices provoke anxiety, this is not ideal.  During one session, realising that Dylan was uncomfortable, I fell silent and started making simple actions: putting my tongue out, touching my nose, pulling a funny face. After a while I had Dylan’s attention.  Gradually he started to copy some of my actions. I heard Dylan’s support worker laughing at us (in a nice way). It felt a bit weird but it was probably the most relaxed I’ve seen Dylan on Facetime recently.

So I haven’t wanted to give up on  Facetime too quickly in case it is something we only need to tweak. Maybe we are scheduling it at an irritating time of day when Dylan is wanting to do something else? Or perhaps we need to move it to another area of the home where Dylan is less distracted? Maybe Dylan and I will develop a silent Facetime language. I would be sorry to lose Facetime as I find it more comfortable than the telephone. At the moment, therefore,  I am asking whoever is supporting Dylan to chat to me, rather than try to involve Dylan – perhaps watching from the sidelines will be enabling for Dylan. I’m not sure what will happen next.  Perhaps we’ll knock it on the head for a while. It feels like a step back, but only a small one.  And who knows – the running group could be a big stride forward.

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‘I have to accept that there will be setbacks’, I told myself on Sunday as I sat alone in a cafe over a bowl of soup, wondering what to do with my unexpected free time.  The battery on my phone had inconveniently died so I couldn’t phone a friend to ask if I could visit or we could meet.  I tried to stay positive while I re-thought the rest of my day. Because, for the first time in the year since Dylan had moved to a residential home, which only the previous morning I had been rejoicing, I had telephoned staff to ask if I could return him earlier than scheduled.

9235c2ffd9004f1f6c76b96e9579c75bThere had been an incident and I had decided it probably best to abandon our planned activity.  So I had dropped Dylan off at the home before lunch on Sunday, rather than at the end of the day, and was pondering my next move from a nearby cafe. I’d probably been undone by my own hubris that morning, I reflected. I had been too relaxed.  I had taken my eye off the ball. I had forgotten that with Dylan I must be vigilant and prepared for the unexpected. It was good to be reminded of this, I told myself –  and lucky that it had been in such a safe environment.

I had taken Dylan to an Autism-Friendly screening of Angry Birds at an out of town multi-screen entertainment centre which Dylan has been to numerous times.  Dylan doesn’t need to go to inclusive screenings any more as he is a seasoned cinema goer and understands the routine. I like to support AF initiatives, however, and as the film was at a convenient time and location I had suggested to Dylan that we go before lunch out and an afternoon walk.

I had a relaxed swagger about me as I helped Dylan to use his CEA card to buy his ticket and queue for his salty popcorn and water. I bought a cup of coffee. I was aware of parents of young autistic children doing what I had needed to do with Dylan years ago: encouraging them into line; helping them to wait and to choose appropriately; supporting them through terrors and tears and mini meltdowns; picking up and carrying or patiently waiting. I probably let myself feel glad that my young man was quietly waiting to be served, behaving beautifully.

cd4c980c1b4e1978ed7fc085e53e708aAnd then it kicked off.  The film wasn’t in the cinema Dylan wanted it to be in (up the escalator). He became an Angry Bird. I saw, in the split second before Dylan did it, what was about to happen: backpack off, frog-jump as high as he could manage, popcorn falling everywhere, like snow, and then Dylan squirming in it, on the floor, yelling in anger.  The staff had clearly had autism awareness training and were prepared; they appeared with brushes and pans and a ‘hazard’ sign, asked me whether it had been sweet or salty (for  a replacement) and what they could best do to support me.

I said that Dylan could sweep it up himself – that it was important that he did – and that I wasn’t sure I wanted him to have replacement popcorn.  So, to the staff’s surprise, I got Dylan to help them clear up. Was there another way into the cinema I wondered? Could we go up the escalator and enter through a back door? But there wasn’t. I wasn’t convinced that I was going to get Dylan into the cinema but thought I would try again and agreed he could have more popcorn. When I told Dylan again, however, that the film was on the ground floor, he prepared to repeat the popcorn party trick. At the very  moment he bent his knees to propel himself into the air I slipped the carton out of his fingers. ‘I think we’ll leave’, I said to the member of staff, as  I escorted Dylan from the cinema, shouting and waving his arms, still pointing to the escalator.

Should I have let him go upstairs? Maybe. Perhaps he only wanted to ride it and would have come back downstairs for the film. I doubt it though. I suspect more likely is that he had a particular auditorium  in mind. I decided I couldn’t take the risk of letting Dylan head upstairs to find myself with a more difficult situation to manage on the mezzanine. Leaving the cinema, however, had made me feel sad;  going to a film together is something we have done for years and a shared activity I have loved. I couldn’t guarantee a film would be showing in a particular auditorium for Dylan.  Were our cinema trips in jeopardy? Was this something else to lose?

WP_20160607_005When I dropped Dylan off at his residential home a member of staff told me I had done exactly as they would by encouraging Dylan to sweep up the mess and then changing the activity. And, she suggested, I might not have to give up cinema trips altogether, just avoid the multi-screen  for a while. Still, I sat staring into my soup, feeling disappointed not just about the day but the  loss of future days. How could I possibly take Dylan to the cinema again, I wondered? It hadn’t occurred to me before that a trip to the cinema might be as much about the auditorium and environment as the film itself for Dylan. I searched through all my cinema memories, asking myself how many times we had been upstairs and how many downstairs. Which films had we watched in which auditorium? I knew Dylan usually headed for particular seats. Now I realised that this varied by auditorium; in one cinema it is row F on the far right, in another it is row A on the far left and in another it is the very back row, far left. Perhaps that morning Dylan had wanted to sit on a particular seat rather than in a particular auditorium?

So I sat turning things over, trying to figure them out. But then I remembered my old diary entry. Instead of staring into my soup, I told myself, I should be enjoying the time I had to myself. A year ago I would have done anything for a bit of space on a Sunday. In the scale of things this was a small step back, after all, not a significant loss.  I had a book of poems in my bag, waiting to be read. And then I would go and look for that laburnum tree I had promised myself…

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The photographs of Dylan were taken by staff during his short break this week. I am really enjoying the laburnum tree which I planted outside my back door.

 

9 thoughts on “Small Steps Back, Big Leaps Forward

  1. It is hard being a mom, isn’t it? You are doing your best, just as all moms try to do. Sometimes we struggle with guilt and blame ourselves for things, because we feel we should know our children thoroughly. I am finding there are always new things to learn about my children. It’s an adventure. Enjoy it!

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  2. I love the process you go through trying to work out what is going on in Dylan’s head and what his behaviour means. And your conviction that it always means SOMEthing, if you can only understand it. This is humbling and beautiful.

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  3. Even though my girl is much younger, and possibly more verbal in some ways, I still get this. I think that she too has very fixed ideas about what she wants to see or do where and when, and in what order, and she can’t or won’t often communicate that. So it does lead to issues. I admire your strength in making him clear up; I’m pretty sure that any suggestion of that in uncertain times would not go down well with my girl! I hope that FaceTime does continue to work out for you – as you say, it could be just a time/schedule change which is needed- encouraging that he still asked for it. Our girl can be very hit and miss about when she will speak with grandparents via FaceTime, so to be honest I don’t push it as I feel it’s something which can cause her anguish (as with all communication, when she’s not on top form!). Hope you feel more at peace with your next session of unexpected free time – I get that it all comes at a price too though xx

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    • It’s always reassuring to hear things can be similar for others – I think because it makes things feel more ordinary and shared 🙂 I would never have made Dylan clear up when he was younger. It’s a fairly recent thing, possibly linked to the fact Dylan now takes some responsibility for sweeping his bedroom and the dining room at his residential home. So I suppose I was trying to extend the idea of responsibility, and taking care of the environment, from home to the cinema. I guess if he’d been in a really unreachable place there’s no way he’d have done as I asked! Thanks for the encouragement re-FT. Dylan was reluctant again tonight so I’ll give it a miss for a while and, as you say, try not to push it, x

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  4. I just looked at your site for the first time as I am looking for mothers who have had or still have children with difficult lives. Looking at the pictures I see that you have a wonderful outlook on raising a child Autism. I had a child with no disabilities until he turned 15 and found the world of drugs. I smart boy who could draw from memory and sing like an angel is down a mere shell. He is now almost 21 and can’t hold down a job or keep a civil tongue in his mouth. We no longer see him as he became to difficult to handle. i have 4 grandchild that I had to think of. I wonder every day if i did the right thing by sending him out into the world to find himself.
    If there is anyone out there who has gone through a life like this please send me some advice. I am thinking of Dyaln, his mom and all the others out there who are experiencing such difficult matters in their family.

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    • Hello – thank you for reading and for leaving this comment – I hope someone sees it who knows of others in your particular situation and who can perhaps suggest links that might be useful. Your situation sounds harrowing and I feel for you and for your son. The only thing I would say is that he is still young and there is time for him to work out whatever he needs to and find his way back to you. Let’s hope in the meantime he has people who can look out for him and that he stays safe through these difficult years. I often think 26 is a sort of watershed in our lives – that this is when we break through some of the difficulties of being young and settle into life with a different strength. So I will pray that your son will find his way back to you and that your relationship with each other will be stronger and deeper for this experience. It is so hard but sometimes we must be patient and wait for our prodigal sons and daughters. I say this having once been separated from my daughter, not quite in the same circumstances as you but nonetheless with great pain. Be strong. I am thinking of you and hoping for blessings on your family. Liz

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      • Hi Elizabeth. Thank you for your prayers. I hope that time makes things better. It was nice to hear from someone. Most days I feel so alone and I could just sit down and cry. I think of all the wonderful so times I had with him and that gets me through. As a believer in God I do feel that things will get better with orayer and faith. Again, thank you for the encouragement .

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