Capacity And Voice: from silent subject to co-author

I was surprised and delighted when someone I had met only virtually, via this blog, asked whether I would be interested in contributing to this year’s National Autistic Society Professional Conference. The conference organisers were keen to involve parental perspectives and to provide a space for the stories of those affected by intellectual disability as well as by autism; would I be able to talk about transition to adulthood in the context of someone who is ‘learning disabled and non-verbal’?

The invitation to speak at the conference came in August last year. In February this year, overwhelmed by marking and the demands of the workplace, I feared I had been too hasty in accepting.  Unable to meet the deadline for the inclusion of my presentation slides in the conference proceedings I suggested I bring them as a handout. ‘How many copies will I need?’ I asked the conference organiser. ‘540 should do it’ she replied.  I stared at the email in disbelief. Could that zero be a slip of the finger?

WP_20160302_001So it was with some trepidation that I arrived at the Telford International Centre earlier this month. The rally-sized hall with two enormous screens and professional sound and lighting engineers were all the evidence I needed that the zero hadn’t been an error. My session was scheduled as a plenary presentation at the end of the second and final day (rather than to a smaller audience as part of one of the four conference strands). Although I am used to delivering presentations and am generally a confident public speaker, this was easily the largest audience I had faced.  As I hadn’t attended an NAS conference previously, this  was also an audience with which I was unfamiliar.  My anxieties were therefore twofold: not just whether I would hold my nerve but if I had pitched my material appropriately.

I had spent some time, on the run up to the conference, pondering the angle for my talk. Although I was happy to tell a single story,  I wanted Dylan’s specific experience to illustrate issues which might be faced by autistic adults with intellectual disability more generally. My instinct to do this arose from my work as an academic where ‘single stories’ are used to illuminate processes and ideas. I was conscious, however, that autism is not my academic field:  I would be presenting material arising from my craft knowledge as a parent rather than from research. How, then, could I identify a conceptual framework against which the experiences of others might be considered?

Happily, in the run-up to the conference I happened on this (as is often the case, in the most unlikely of places). As the mother of someone who is ‘non-verbal’ I enjoy reading books about silence, an interest which sometimes takes me into theological literature (this post, for example, references the use of silence and hand signs in monastic communities).  In the weeks before the conference I had been reading The Edge of Words by Rowan Williams (the former Archbishop of Canterbury) and it was here I would find my framework for talking about the transition to adulthood of a learning disabled and non-verbal child.

*

Rowan Williams’ interest in silence is in the context of his relationship with God.  In exploring the theological implications of silence, however, he considers other experiences of silence including that of non-speaking children and adults with intellectual disability and autism. Autistic people who lack mental capacity, Williams argues, have ‘a point of view and a capacity to create working symbols’ ; our task, he notes, is to make the space to allow these symbols to ‘surface and connect’.

Some of Williams’ illustrations of this process were familiar to me as they are based on the ideas of Phoebe Caldwell whose work I admire. I found Williams’ development  of these ideas compelling, however; both the poet and the autistic child or adult, he suggests, inhabit difficult territory where they are lost for words, pushed into extremis in the search for a language.  Putting language ‘under pressure’ in this way encourages the use of  poetic practices such as symbol and association to resolve the difficulty. Thus both poets and those with ASD (specifically the ‘non-verbal’) trade in paradox and metaphor.

As a poet as well as a mother I found this suggestion attractive. Dylan, I have often contended, is a poet by nature. Many of the associations and connections he makes in his search for ways of communicating would grace any poem (I give some examples in this post). Williams’ observation therefore made sense to me and helped me to an observation that would become the cornerstone of my presentation: that in order to ‘hear’ Dylan’s voice during transition I had to draw on my identity as a poet as much as (perhaps more than) my sense as mother or academic.

To illustrate this I selected five ‘scenes’ from Dylan’s transition. Some were examples of when I had ‘failed’ to hear Dylan’s voice (perhaps because I had been too rigid in my thinking) and others of times when Dylan or I had made creative connections and communicated more effectively. In scene three, for example, I suggest that Dylan might use ears as a symbol of trust and in scene five I give an example of the application of metaphor (getting lost) to my own decision-making. Transferring poetic tactics to everyday practices is something Rowan Williams acknowledges may be efficacious. While not wanting to suggest gut-knowledge as the basis for all decision-making my presentation concluded:

  • ‘Giving voice’ to the non-verbal requires us to be open to instinct and intuition as well as to logic and calculation.
  • Can involve listening to a young person’s behaviour rather than involving them in formal decision-making processes.
  • Requires us to pay attention to silence and absence of language as well as to excess.

As I put the finishing touches to my conference slides I considered ways of framing Dylan’s contribution to the narrative. Could I insert bracketed silences, indicating potential gaps in the presentation? Include a blank slide perhaps? These reflections encouraged me to review my assumptions about authorship. Previously I had thought of my material as an auto-ethnography with two subjects; now I realised the narrative also had two authors. The day before I left for the conference I changed my title slide: this presentation was no longer ‘For Dylan’, it was with him.

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References:

Phoebe Caldwell (2006) Finding You, Finding Me. Jessica Kingsley Publishing
Rowan Williams  (2014) The Edge of Words.  Bloomsbury

10 thoughts on “Capacity And Voice: from silent subject to co-author

    • Yes. She was kind and supportive at the conference too, not just to me but to others as well. I like to think of it as an act of faith (based on my blog) rather than ‘kindness’. It was a risk certainly, but a calculated one. I wish more people were brave in that way 🙂 Thanks for reading!

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  1. Hi Elizabeth, just to say how much I enjoyed your presentation at the NAS conference and how lovely it was to meet you. I was so sorry to have had to rush off as soon as you had finished speaking but am really pleased to have found your blog. I think the way that you describe and conceptualise the non spoken communication between you in Dylan is really helpful and is something that I very much recognise from my own interactions with people who for a variety of reasons do not use words. I really hope that our paths cross again
    Best wishes
    Noelle

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    • Noelle it is lovely to hear from you! Thank you for reading my blog – and thank you for your comment which I really appreciate. It was lovely to meet you – I enjoyed the time we spent. I too really hope that we encounter each other again. Liz, x

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  2. Thanks for this post, Liz. It very eloquently contextualises and explains the direction of your recent ideas. Fascinating, original and thought-provoking – as ever. Also ground on which to build even more conceptual and practical links, I suspect. It seems ironic, in the light of your post, that autism is commonly regarded as a deficit of the imagination.

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    • Thank you Caroline – and for your perceptive feedback on an early version of the presentation. You are right about the irony of it – I love the link between poetry and ASC Williams makes through his concept of ‘extreme language’ 🙂

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