Learning By Writing: reflections on blogging (i)

booksIt’s two years – virtually to the day – since I made my first blog post. I had no idea what I was doing that day: I simply typed into my barely-developed WordPress site and hit publish. The piece was different to my subsequent posts in that I didn’t write it offline, there were no drafts, I didn’t include images and it was relatively short. It was also different in terms of ‘voice’: more meditative and detached. Nonetheless, it has consistently been near the top of my blog post leader board and currently stands as my 6th most popular post (out of 82). This is not due just to longevity; there is no direct relationship between the number of views a post has received and when it was posted. My advice to anyone reading this who is hesitating about making that first post? Just do it!

*

The focus and style of my first post puzzle me as my reason for setting up the blog had been more campaigning than musing. It was my frustration at the lack of provision for autistic adults with severe learning disabilities in my area that led to Living with Autism. My son had left his autism-specialist school that summer but had not been allocated any continuing provision. I was concerned about Dylan, who needed the structure and routine of a specialist environment, but was also anxious about how I was going to return to work. When a legal action against my local authority uncovered failures and omissions in Dylan’s care, my instinct was to share what I had discovered. My blog would be worthwhile, I told myself, if it helped other parents to get information I had not had access to.

If someone had told me, when I made that first post, that it would be two years before Dylan was allocated an appropriate placement I would have said I could not manage. And if I had known that I would have to learn how to support Dylan through some difficult ‘challenging behaviour’ I would have doubted my capacity to cope. If it had been explained to me, then, that in order to keep Dylan at home through these darkest of days I would have to make radical changes to my working life, I would have hesitated. And if I had been aware that surviving these years would come at high cost (to my poetry, my relationships and my health) I would have wondered whether I had the resources.

Perhaps it’s just as well we don’t know how the road ahead looks and what it will require of us. Most parents, when facing a challenging situation, give what is needed – and sometimes it is through such challenge that we discover just how deep our resources are and how much we are able to give. But I don’t think that we find this in ourselves alone; most of us also draw strength from some external force. For many of us, this is friends and family. For some, it is faith. For others, work or an interest or hobby. All of these have been important to me. I want to use this post, however, to reflect on the positive contribution of something I did not anticipate: blogging.

Learning through writing

batdetectorFor me, the most interesting writing is transforming; if I don’t come out of the process seeing the world differently, I’m not really interested in finishing it. This is true of any piece of writing, whether it is a poem, a short story or an academic article –  so perhaps I shouldn’t be so surprised that writing posts for this blog turned out to be a vehicle for learning and development.

If I want to be changed by what I write, I cannot be too in control of it. While I always have a defined topic in mind, and some key points or examples I want to communicate or explore, I try to leave enough space for a piece to breathe by itself once it has lungs. It can feel very scary when a piece heads off down a branch line, but I know that these diversions can lead to unexpected blessings as well as to dead ends. So I never plan a piece of writing (a poem or article or blog post) in too much detail or to the end because I don’t know, until I’ve written it, what I know. This might sound strange to people who don’t connect writing with thinking but for me the two processes seem to be inseparable; I simply don’t understand something until I’ve written about it.

I think for me this is to do with being a visual learner. I need to see how things connect with each other so I love moving sections of text around in a piece of writing to see if I can find new and surprising links. The connections between sections are important to me; I think this is about finding the progression and coherence in ideas. Perhaps my main preoccupation, however, is pattern and paradox; a concern with things that are similar and things that are different seems to underpin most of my writing. I suspect that it is through this re-organisation of material that (if I’m lucky) I happen across new connections and alternative ways of knowing.

So, at its best, writing blog posts has been a process of discovery; some of the pieces I have written have genuinely changed the way I think. This has particularly been the case for posts which focus on knotty abstract concepts, such as ‘independence’ or ‘voice’, and for sensitive topics, such as suicide and ‘challenging behaviour’ , but has also been so for posts with a more applied focus. Writing about the early interventions I made with Dylan when he was first diagnosed, for example, enabled me to understand the meaning and significance of the ‘treatments’ in a way I doubt I would have grasped had I not explored them through writing.

Writing is increasingly used therapeutically with professionals, particularly in health and allied sectors, and for several years now I have used it myself with staff and students in education in order to explore issues in personal and professional development. Keeping this blog has reminded me of the power of writing as a tool for exploring and transforming our knowledge, understanding and beliefs. Perhaps there should be more opportunities for parents and professionals to explore their experiences of autism through writing in structured and supported settings?

Making space

The other way in which keeping a blog has been helpful is in the space it creates for thinking and reflection. It’s a bit like having time in the therapist’s chair; setting myself a target of one post a week encouraged me to prioritise and make room for this. I would choose a topic from the scribbled list on my desk and spend half the week thinking about it (in whatever space I was in) before making the space to sit down and see where it would lead. Sometimes the posts would be written swiftly but if it were a thorny topic, or I found myself up a branch line, it could take longer than planned. Occasionally something I hadn’t expected came bowling in, elbowing its way to the top of the list, and sometimes (by contrast) the magic didn’t happen: there was no flash of pattern or paradox.

One thing I resolved when I started the blog was that I wouldn’t keep it at Dylan’s expense; on the ethics page of this site I identify a range of ways in which it could enrich Dylan’s life and a protocol to protect him from harm. One issue I don’t refer to on the ethics page, however, is the practical challenge of making space. When I set the blog up I told myself that it would be daft to be tapping away at a keyboard, writing about caring for Dylan, instead of actually caring for him. I had to find a space to blog which took nothing away from the time I spent with Dylan. How, as a single parent with a full time job, did I manage this? The short answer is that I sacrificed my diary and my poems.

The early morning hour before Dylan wakes, which I had previously used for writing, became ‘blog time’. Consequently, I haven’t done much with the manuscript of poems I was working on when I started this blog. In fact I have been so little involved in the world of my poems that it has been hard to think of myself as a poet at all some days. This would make me sad except that a) I’m not scared of fallow periods b) I have continued to edit poems that were already written c) the poems worth writing will still get written (albeit differently) and d) even if I never write another poem it was worth it.

The other sacrifice I made was to reduce the amount of time I spent writing a journal; a daily diarist from the age of 14, in the last two years I have allowed myself only one entry a week. Could I not have made the discoveries I refer to above through the process of writing in a journal? I doubt it. In fact I suspect that I have rarely discovered something new through a journal entry . I think this might be because I don’t pay the same attention to structure and organisation in a diary; as it’s handwritten, text does not get moved around and re-organised. I am therefore less likely to unearth pattern and paradox. I am also less concerned with logic and evidence in a diary entry and am far more indulgent and much less rigorous. Perhaps it is the one form of writing where I don’t expect transformation?

Being Provisional

dartofgreenAs I begin to think about writing poetry again I ask myself if blogging will have spoiled my poems the way squash once ruined my tennis (or so I claimed in the summer of 1986). What, I wonder, is the impact of one form on another? I am convinced that we take it into our deep subconscious; I know by instinct, for example, when I have written a sonnet-length piece.

When I started blogging I realised my posts were longer than most. I also realised, however, that I was incapable of writing to the more usual length of 1000 words and I have to work to limit myself to 2000; my natural ‘prose breath’ is, I suspect, closer to 4000 words. One thing I have enjoyed about the form, however, is its provisional nature. The WordPress facilities allow me to go on editing a piece even after it has been published; for me (for whom nothing is ever finished and everything can only ever be provisional) this is a marvellous format. I am an inveterate drafter and editor of my own work. Blogging allows me to go on polishing and I love it for this.

I have a reservation about this post-publication editing facility, however. If someone has ‘liked’ my post and I then edit it, how do I know they would still approve? I comfort myself (and, I hope, you) by limiting my edits to style not substance. If I change my mind about something as a result of comments from readers then I add a postscript or correct myself through the comment trail or in a subsequent post. Reader interaction with a blog is of course a central feature of the medium, particularly in relation to the capacity for learning and change. In the early days of my blog, when I had posted only a handful of pieces, a colleague suggested that my voice sounded ‘careful’. I replied that I checked my claims, of course, and was careful to make clear that my observations were based only on a single story. I realised later, however, that she hadn’t used ‘careful’ in the sense of ‘rigorous’; my colleague had meant I was holding back. Perhaps as well as being excited by the idea of a conversation with an international audience, I was nervous about the interactive format? My next post will reflect on this and on what I have learned through dialogue.

10 thoughts on “Learning By Writing: reflections on blogging (i)

  1. “If I want to be changed by what I write, I cannot be too in control of it.”

    Fascinating…and true. I too wrote “carefully” when I began, picking and choosing my words fearful the entire world would read them. Ha! I never dreamed I would grow so publicly open and vulnerable. But doing so definitely facilitated the personal healing I needed to undergo.

    Really enjoyed this post. Looking forward to the next. x

    Like

    • Thanks Christy – I really enjoyed writing about writing instead of about autism for a change 🙂 Interesting that even brave, honest, unflinching you recognises that you were ‘careful’ initially. I had planned to write about writing and about the readers as one post but (as ever!) it got too long. Looking forward to writing the next one and to getting back to catching up with some blogs again (esp. yours). I’ve been taking a break but summer is now officially over, x

      Liked by 1 person

  2. Hi, Liz, how are you and Dylan?
    I’ve noticed an interesting point about the revision in your text. The fact that if you revise your text, the “likes” may not correspond to the original one is an authentic fear, I guess. But, anyway, we do it in PhD Thesis all the time, allowing minor corrections after the committee evaluation.
    Please keep blogging.

    Best regards
    Eder

    Like

    • Hi Eder – Dylan and I are doing OK thanks – transition is still going well and Dylan is now happy to leave some of his belongings in his new home when he visits me. It is back to work and school for everyone from today so I think we are entering the next phase of this change…

      Yes, there are other examples of changes to a text being made after it has been reviewed/evaluated. I wonder how common it is for bloggers to develop their posts after publication? I suspect not very. Even so… Thank you for your encouragement, Eder 🙂

      Like

  3. Pingback: Learning Through Dialogue: reflections on blogging (ii) | Living with Autism

  4. Pingback: Day 25: Quarter | Living with/out Autism

  5. Pingback: Day 86: Food Shopping | Living with(out) Autism

  6. Thank you for articulating something I have also experienced with blogging. I’m also a visual learner and writing helps me collect my thoughts. Sometimes I start writing and it just spills out in the most beautiful way and I think ‘how did that happen?’ Found you on Twitter and will retweet after I post this comment.

    Like

  7. Pingback: Day 100: Practice | Living with(out) Autism

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s